TRANSDISCIPLINARY
CONVERGENCE

A STUDY OF COLLABORATION
IN INTERSTITIAL SPACES


MICHAEL FRAZIER
M.ARCH


This graduate project explores how the convergence of disciplines at the post-secondary level, particularly through interstitial spaces, leads to increased collaboration and innovation. In order for academia to effectively address the complex, global challenges that we currently face, students and faculty must learn to be more agile and move fluidly in situations outside their primary discipline.

Architecturally there are many ways to foster active learning. The interstitial spaces between what is traditionally considered “primary” programmed areas, acting predominantly as circulation space, is a particularly interesting space which is often neglected. This space holds considerable potential due to it’s inherent flexibility and democratic nature.

This thesis grounds itself in the real-world context of Applied One, an interdisciplinary building proposed for UBC’s campus. The purpose of this project is not meant to explore massing of, nor the complex programmatic relationships present in, Applied One. Instead, it is intended to explore the principles of collaborative design and implement these into a series of designed experiences which are critical for the success of Applied One.

This project was intended to inspire and start a conversation around the future of higher education applied science buildings. It is meant to lay a foundation for ideation moving forward. The designs are intended to be somewhat abstract to allow for adaptation into a variety of successful schemes.

Fundamentally, a building’s “primary” programs should be secondary and subservient to the interstitial spaces.

COMMITTEE: 
Jennifer Cutbill
Chris Macdonald
Adam Rysanek [CHAIR]
Ailish Statham