BREAKING FIRE WITH FIRE

TOWARDS A NEW PARK TYPOLOGY

ALIX TIER
MLA


Wildfires have left their mark on the British Columbia landscape for centuries. As we continue to inhabit land closer to fire prone areas, these fires and our relationship to them will continue to shape the landscape and our communities as we know them.

This project explores the role of landscape architects and designers in moving towards a new type of wildfire management that considers both the utilitarian and experiential qualities of various management practices. While maintaining the functional value of these practices, the project investigates how the layering of different value systems including recreation, education, economic and habitat values can contribute to changing our current understanding of fire. The project moves towards a new park typology that seeks to challenge our social, cultural and ecological relationship to fire, particularly in fire prone communities of British Columbia.

The final site condition proposes a series of spatial conditions that allow for various human and non-human user groups to occupy the site at different times throughout the year.

Existing site features, such as trails, are utilized for recreation and management, acting as an edge for fire breaks.

The site itself is majorly self-funding with a community forestry project integrated into the management of the site, helping to offset the high cost of proper forest fire site management and serving as a space to educate.

Supervisors:
Susan Herrington [Chair]
Sophie Maguire